Cardamom

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History

Cardamom is considered to be one of the world’s oldest spices. The use of this spice dates back at least 4000 years. Ancient Egyptians used Cardamom for many medicinal purposes, as part of rituals and even for embalming. They chewed cardamom pods as a way to help keep their breath minty and to help clean their teeth.

The Greeks and Romans used Cardamom for its pungent aroma. It was a main ingredient in perfumes and aromatic oils.

Vikings first discovered this spice during their travels and brought it back to Scandinavia.

Cardamom originally came from wild plants located in the Western Ghats in Southern India. The plants grew in such abundance in this region that this area became known as Cardamom Hills.

During the 19th century, plantations of cardamom were set up by British colonists and this is where much of the green and black cardamom that we use still comes from today.

Guatemala is the biggest commercial producer of cardamom. In some parts of Guatemala, it is considered even more valuable than coffee as a crop.

 

Benefits of Cardamom

1. Antioxidant and Diuretic Properties May Lower Blood Pressure

Cardamom may be helpful for people with high blood pressure.

In one study, researchers gave three grams of cardamom powder a day to 20 adults who were newly diagnosed with high blood pressure. After 12 weeks, blood pressure levels had significantly decreased to the normal range (3Trusted Source).

The promising results of this study may be related to the high levels of antioxidants in cardamom. In fact, the participants’ antioxidant status had increased by 90% by the end of the study. Antioxidants have been linked to lower blood pressure (3Trusted Source4Trusted Source).

Researchers also suspect that the spice may lower blood pressure due to its diuretic effect, meaning it can promote urination to remove water that builds up in your body, for example around your heart.

Cardamom extract has been shown to increase urination and decrease blood pressure in rats.

2. May Contain Cancer-Fighting Compounds

The compounds in cardamom may help fight cancer cells.

Studies in mice have shown that cardamom powder can increase the activity of certain enzymes that help fight cancer (6Trusted Source7Trusted Source).

The spice may also enhance the ability of natural killer cells to attack tumors (8Trusted Source).

In one study, researchers exposed two groups of mice to a compound that causes skin cancer and fed one group 500 mg of ground cardamom per kg (227 mg per pound) of weight per day (7Trusted Source).

After 12 weeks, only 29% of the group who ate the cardamom developed cancer, compared to over 90% of the control group (7Trusted Source).

Research on human cancer cells and cardamom indicate similar results. One study showed that a certain compound in the spice stopped oral cancer cells in test tubes from multiplying (9Trusted Source).

Even though the results are promising, these studies have only been conducted on mice or in test tubes. Human research is needed before stronger claims can be made.

3. May Protect from Chronic Diseases Thanks to Anti-Inflammatory Effects

Cardamom is rich in compounds that may fight inflammation.

Inflammation occurs when your body is exposed to foreign substances. Acute inflammation is necessary and beneficial, but long-term inflammation can lead to chronic diseases (10Trusted Source11Trusted Source12).

Antioxidants, found in abundance in cardamom, protect cells from damage and stop inflammation from occurring (13Trusted Source).

One study found that cardamom extract in doses of 50–100 mg per kg (23–46 mg per pound) of body weight was effective in inhibiting at least four different inflammatory compounds in rats (14Trusted Source).

Another study in rats showed that eating cardamom powder decreased liver inflammation induced by eating a diet high in carbs and fat (15Trusted Source).

Though there are not as many studies on the anti-inflammatory effects of cardamom in humans, research shows that supplements may increase antioxidant status by up to 90% (3Trusted Source

4. May Help with Digestive Problems, Including Ulcers

Cardamom has been used for thousands of years to help with digestion.

It’s often mixed with other medicinal spices to relieve discomfort, nausea and vomiting (1).

The most researched property of cardamom, as it pertains to relieving stomach issues, is its possible ability to heal ulcers.

In one study, rats were fed extracts of cardamom, turmeric and sembung leaf in hot water before being exposed to high doses of aspirin to induce stomach ulcers. These rats developed fewer ulcers compared to rats that only received aspirin (16Trusted Source).

A similar study in rats found that cardamom extract alone could completely prevent or reduce the size of gastric ulcers by at least 50%.

In fact, at doses of 12.5 mg per kg (5.7 mg per pound) of body weight, cardamom extract was more effective than a common anti-ulcer medication (17Trusted Source).

Test-tube research also suggests that cardamom may protect against Helicobacter pylori, a bacteria linked to the development of most stomach ulcer issues (18Trusted Source).

More research is needed to know if the spice would have the same effect against ulcers in humans.

 

5. May Treat Bad Breath and Prevent Cavities

The use of cardamom to treat bad breath and improve oral health is an ancient remedy.

In some cultures, it’s common to freshen your breath by eating entire cardamom pods after a meal (1).

Even the chewing gum manufacturer Wrigley uses the spice in one of its products.

The reason why cardamom can lead to minty fresh breath may have to do with its ability to fight common mouth bacteria (19Trusted Source).

One study found that cardamom extracts were effective in fighting five bacteria that can cause dental cavities. In some test-tube cases, the extracts prevented the growth of the bacteria by up to 0.82 inches (2.08 cm) (20).

Additional research shows that cardamom extract can reduce the number of bacteria in saliva samples by 54% (21).

However, all of these studies have been conducted in test tubes, making it unclear how the results may apply to humans.

 

Cardamom Fragrance Oil Uses

Appetite (loss of)
Colic
Fatigue
Halitosis (Bad Breath)
Stress

IMPORTANT: All Brilliant Scents products are for external use only unless otherwise indicated. This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease, and it should not be used by anyone who is pregnant or under the care of a medical practitioner.